Leicester’s success could spell trouble for managers.

Okay so I know Leicester’s story is what football is all about. The David versus Goliath fable no one saw coming and many other clichés that have been (rightly) used to describe their incredible and inspiring achievement. Here comes the flip side of all that positivity. What happens to the teams in the lower half of the league who have had expectations not just raised by Leicester’s achievements but propelled into the Premier League stratosphere?

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Under fire gaffer Quique Sanchez Flores

Normally amongst right minded people you could dumb down any ridiculous expectations but the world of football club owners in the Premier League is not exactly dominated but such people. You only have to look at Gino Pozzo at Watford to see that managing expectations is one of the hardest parts of the job for Premier League managers nowadays.

At the end of this season Quique Sanchez Flores will sit down with the hierarchy in the Hornets boardroom and undertake an end of season review. Nothing surprising there, it is common practice for football clubs up and down the land and further afield. Here’s the crazy part, the man is under serious threat of losing his job! This won’t be helped by the fact that everyone’s new favourite team won the league this year on a pretty similar budget.

What about Stoke? Hughes has spent good money at the Britannia and has brought in real quality leading some fans to rename the club ‘Stokalona’. For all of their flare and great performances this year there have been some equally bad humblings, especially in recent weeks. Does this mean the Welshman is now looking over his shoulder? With two games to go Stoke are tenth, a position lower than they achieved last season. So for all the exciting players they’ve brought in are they really any better off than they were under Tony Pulis?

Speaking of Pulis’ old teams what’s happened to Palace? At the beginning of this season people were talking of how Pardew had taken the team forward but for an FA cup final he too might be wondering if his days at the club were numbered.

Every great success has a consequence. It is always fantastic to dream of better times and new beginnings however it would be a catastrophe for the sides that finish in the bottom half if their managers felt the axe might come down on them at any time. For many that is already the case but Leicester’s success could and probably will ramp up that pressure. Many owners will ask ‘if Ranieri can do it why can’t (insert managers name here)’.

Some football fans are already waiting to see if Newcastle can avoid the drop so they can have a punt on them winning the league next year. If Benitez, a European cup winner, does manage to keep the magpies afloat then what price the Premier League title next season?

Everton fans have seen what another side in blue can achieve and are angry their man Martinez hasn’t done the same at Goodison. This is not a defence of the ever positive Spaniard as he has real talent and quality in that Everton side that has underachieved. You can’t help but wonder if the ‘dily ding, dily dong’ philosophy of another footballing nice guy will spell the end for him. In any other season it would just be written off as a bad one and time to start again.

Finally a man in the top half of the table who has been described by one of his oldest enemies as a serial under achiever, Arsene Wenger: In a season where both Manchester clubs have wavered, Chelsea lost the plot and Liverpool were once again rebuilding, Wenger is likely to see north London rivals Spurs finish above his Arsenal team. This season Arsenal didn’t bow out of the title race after pressure from one of England’s super powers, no this year they lost out on the title to Leicester City. The Foxes story is fantastic for neutrals everywhere. It’s everyone else who is worried.

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Troy Deeney: A man whose troubled past laid the foundations for current success

In the last few years the Premier League has lost some natural leaders, many of whom have not been replaced. Liverpool are only just coming to terms with the loss of Gerrard; Manchester United have lost three pivotal figures in Gill, Ferguson and Vidic and Arsenal are still struggling to replace Adams and Vieira.  It’s likely that come the end of this season John Terry will walk away from a glittering career at Chelsea and yet another player from England’s golden generation will have ended their relationship with the Premier League.

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Watford Captain Troy Deeney

Another London club and one who can’t compete financially with Chelsea have no such problem. Having secured Premier League survival and an FA Cup semi-final, Watford owe much of this season’s success to the leadership of duo Troy Deeney and Quique Sánchez Flores. Deeney was a goal scorer in an otherwise disappointing 2-1 defeat at Wembley but no one could accuse the Watford captain of underperforming.  In an interview with Soccer AM earlier this year Deeney opened up about his relationship with his boss:  “He’s a legend. You can talk to him about anything from the things at home that might be stressing you out to not having enough sleep to train properly”. Not many players are so open about enjoying such a relationship with their manager which makes speculation that the Spaniard may lose his job at the end of the season all the more bizarre.

If the manager is the leader off the pitch then Deeney more than fulfils that role on it. A vocal leader of men, his displays are at the very least full of effort. No one could accuse this guy of not living up to the job required.   Things were not always so bright for the Hornet’s number nine though. The lifelong Birmingham City fan grew up in Chemsley Wood eight miles out of the city centre.  At 14 he was expelled from school and left education at 16 with no GCSE’s. He began working as a brick layer before starting his professional football career at Walsall. In 2010 he signed for Watford for an eventual fee of £500,000.

In 2012 Deeney followed a path walked previously by his father who had spent various stints in jail. Troy was imprisoned for three months for his involvement in a brawl where he kicked a man in the head. Deeney describes his time inside as ‘the best thing that ever happened to him’ leaving with GCSE’s in Maths, English and Science. Above all else the he had a renewed sense of perspective.

Since then he hasn’t looked back and isn’t just Watford’s captain but their talisman. When it’s going well at Vicarage Road you can be sure Deeney is in the goals and assists. When they are struggling no one is more willing to roll up their sleeves and put a shift in. To describe Deeney merely as a hard worker is an insult to the goals record he has achieved this season and throughout his Watford career. Troy Deeney is a captain in every sense of the word. No one is more important to their team in an era where that is less and less the case in the Premier League.